“I realized that with support from other people, I am not alone.”
– I ACT Participant

 

 

 

Resources
 

Learn more about HIV/AIDS >

 

Download the I ACT Programme Overview >

 

Download our brochures and marketing materials >

 

Learn how to implement I ACT or STEPS in your community >

 

Review our syllabus for group meetings and educational sessions >

 

Access facilitator training and support manuals >

All I ACT resources were supported by Cooperative Agreement Number 1U2GPS001816 from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.

IMPLEMENTATION GUIDES

 

 

Integrated Access to Care and Treatment, I ACT

 

The I ACT Implementation guide offers step-by-step guidance for individuals and organisations interested in developing I ACT programmes.

 

The guide also contains the following Appendices:

  • Sample Situational Analysis, Interview Guide
  • Sample Application for Implementing Partners
  • Sample Support Group Facilitator Job Description
  • Pre- and post-training Assessment for Facilitators
  • Content Training Evaluation of Trainers
  • Skills Training Evaluation of Trainers

 

Download the I ACT Implementation Guide > [6.4MB]

 

 

Strengthening Prevention Services, STEPS

 

The STEPS Implementation guide contains detailed instructions for individuals and organisations interested in developing STEPS programmes.

 

The guide also refers to these implementation-related documents:

 

Download the STEPS Implementation Guide > [3.7MB]

 

SYLLABI

 
 
 

Please LOGIN before downloading the following curricula:

 

I ACT Guide to Group Meetings [32.12MB]

 

  • Cover page Introduction
  • Section 1. Connecting and Sharing, HIV/AIDS Basics
  • Section 2. Treatment Literacy
  • Section 3. Acceptance of Status and Disclosure
  • Section 4. Prevention with Positives
  • Section 5. Nutrition and Self-care
  • Section 6. Moving Forward
  • Section 7. Handouts
  • Section 8. Forms

 

 

Adolescent I ACT Guide to Group Meetings [60.48MB]

 

  • Introduction: Sexual Reproductive Health for Adolescents
  • Section 1. Connecting and Sharing, HIV/AIDS Basics
  • Section 2. Treatment Literacy
  • Section 3. Acceptance of Status and Disclosure
  • Section 4. Sexual Reproductive Health and HIV Transmission
  • Section 5. Nutrition and Self-care
  • Section 6. HIV Prevention and Risk Reduction
  • Section 7. Moving Forward

 

 

STEPS Guide to Group Meetings [18.84MB]

 

  • Complete 6-section curriculum for group meetings and educational sessions
  • Attendance and evaluation forms

 

TRAINING MANUALS

 

 

Please LOGIN before downloading the following manuals:

 

I ACT


Content Training curriculum for Facilitators

Training Presentation [15.86MB]

Participant Manual [13.72MB]

Trainer Manual [15.16MB]

4 Video clips from the film, Yesterday [126.45MB]

Training Handouts [2.87MB]

Training Appendix [4.99MB]


Skills Training curriculum for Facilitators

Training Presentation [15.86MB]

Participant Manual [7.94]

Trainer Manual [9.65MB]

Training Handouts [862kb]

Training Appendix [1.37MB]

 

 

Adolescent I ACT

 

Content and Skills Training curriculum for Facilitators

  • Introduction to the Training Manual [2.5MB]
  • Training Manual [19.3MB]

 

 

STEPS

 

Content and Skills Training curriculum for Facilitators

  • Complete Training Presentation [41.3MB]
  • Training Manual [12.8MB]

 

 

Facilitator Mentoring

  • I ACT Mentorship Programme Guideline [549kb]
  • Appendices to the Guideline [37kb]
  • I ACT Facilitator Mentorship Agreement [13kb]

 

 

Facilitator Mirror Sessions [2.8MB]

 

The I ACT Mirror Sessions Workbook, including:

  • Session 1. Self-Reflection and Basic Counselling Skills
  • Session 2. Case Discussions
  • Session 3. Role Expectations
  • Session 4. Loss and Bereavement
  • Session 5. Dealing with Denial
  • Session 6. Domestic Violence
  • Session 7. Stages of Grief
  • Session 8. Crisis Counselling
  • Sessions 9 and 10. Termination

USEFUL INFO ABOUT HIV/AIDS

 
 

 

What are HIV, AIDS and STIs ?

 

HIV is the Human Immune Deficiency Virus. HIV is a virus that attacks the white blood cells responsible for maintaining the body’s immune system. The resulting decrease in the body’s ability to fight infection is known as immune deficiency.

 

AIDS is the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. A person can be described as having AIDS when HIV-related immune deficiency is so severe that various life-threatening infections and cancers occur. These conditions only occur because the immune system is weakened.

 

STIs are Sexually Transmitted Infections. STIs are infections that are passed from an infected person to an uninfected person through sexual contact, including oral, vaginal and anal intercourse. STIs can also be transmitted from a mother to her unborn child or through infected blood products.

 

 

How is HIV transmitted?

 

Only certain fluids – blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), rectal fluids, vaginal fluids, and breast milk—from an HIVinfected person can transmit HIV. These fluids must come in contact with a mucous membrane or damaged tissue or be directly injected into the bloodstream (from a needle or syringe) for transmission to possibly occur. Mucous membranes can be found inside the rectum, the vagina, the opening of the penis and the mouth. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV Transmission)

 

 

I think I have HIV, what should I do?

 

Go to your local primary healthcare clinic or doctor, get tested for HIV and understand the test results.

 

A positive test result means:

  • HIV infection
  • Antibodies are being produced at the detectable level
  • It is possible to transmit HIV to others
  • HIV will require lifestyle changes and medical services including treatment when necessary

 

A negative test result means:

  • No detectable HIV as of 6 weeks ago
  • It is possible to become infected with HIV in the future

 

 

I have HIV. How often should I see someone for medical services?

 

Every 6 months for blood testing and other care that may be needed

 

 

Where can I get treated for HIV?

 

Go to your local primary healthcare clinic or doctor. If the clinic does not provide HIV care and treatment, it will refer you to your nearest HIV treatment site.

 

In South Africa, you can also call:

  • HIV 911 on 0860 448 911 – Consultants provide confidential assistance and referrals to accredited HIV testing facilities and HIV/ AIDS support services
  • National AIDS Helpline on 0800 012 322 – Providing confidential, 24-hour, toll-free telephone counselling, information and referrals for those infected and affected by HIV/AIDS

 

 

What are opportunistic infections (OIs)?

 

Opportunistic Infections take advantage of a weak immune system, hence, the infection takes the “opportunity.” As HIV replicates, the immune system weakens and becomes more susceptible to OIs. Active tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for people living with HIV in South Africa.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers more detailed information including a list of the most common opportunistic infections.

 

 

What is TB? How is TB spread? How do you get tested for TB?

 

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person to person through the air. TB usually affects the lungs, but it can also affect other parts of the body, such as the brain, the kidneys, or the spine. A person with TB can die if they do not get treatment.

 

TB germs are put into the air when a person with TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. These germs can stay in the air for several hours, depending on the environment. Persons who breathe in the air containing these TB germs can become infected; this is called latent TB infection.

 

There are two tests that can be used to help detect TB infection: a skin test or TB blood test. The Mantoux tuberculin skin test is performed by injecting a small amount of fluid (called tuberculin) into the skin in the lower part of the arm. A person given the tuberculin skin test must return within 48 to 72 hours to have a trained health care worker look for a reaction on the arm. The TB blood tests measure how the patient’s immune system reacts to the germs that cause TB. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tuberculosis Fact Sheets)

 

 

What are common symptoms of TB?

 

Symptoms of TB disease depend on where in the body the TB bacteria are growing. TB disease symptoms may include:

  • A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer
  • Pain in the chest
  • Coughing up blood or sputum (phlegm from deep inside the lungs)
  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • No appetite
  • Chills
  • Fever
  • Sweating at night

 

(Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease)

 

 

What is the link between HIV and TB?

 

HIV infection weakens the immune system. If a person’s immune system gets weak, TB infection can activate and become TB disease. Someone with TB infection and HIV infection has a very high risk of developing TB disease. Without treatment, these two infections can work together to shorten the life of the person infected with both. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tuberculosis: the Connection between TB and HIV)

 

People infected with HIV are up to 50 times more likely to develop TB than HIV-negative people, and not surprisingly, TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected individuals, despite the fact that TB is curable.

 

South Africa’s TB situation has reached a crisis point in several provinces. The country has one of the highest estimated TB rates in the world, ranking fourth among the 22 WHO-determined high-burden countries, with an estimated 461,000 new cases reported each year. The South African TB/HIV co-infection rate is also high, with approximately 55% of TB patients also testing positive for HIV. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Programs in South Africa – TB and HIV)

 

 

Where can I get more information about HIV?

 

More information from the South African National Department of Health

 

Other sources for information about HIV